2014 Prague by David Cerny

2014 Prague by David Cerny, Stainless Steel, height 10 meters, 

mass : 45 tons, 38 of them moving,

42 independently driven layers and max revolving speed of each layer 6 RPM

David Cerny gained notoriety in 1991 by painting a Soviet tank pink, to serve as a war memorial in central Prague.[1] As the Monument to Soviet tank crews was still a national cultural monument at that time, his act of civil disobedience was considered “hooliganism” and he was briefly arrested.

Another of David Černý’s conspicuous contributions to Prague is “Tower Babies,” a series of cast figures of crawling infants attached to Žižkov Television Tower.

David Cerny

David Cerny

David Cerny

 

 

He gained notoriety in 1991 by painting a Soviet tank pink, to serve as a war memorial in central Prague.[1] As the Monument to Soviet tank crews was still a national cultural monument at that time, his act of civil disobedience was considered “hooliganism” and he was briefly arrested.

Another of Černý’s conspicuous contributions to Prague is “Tower Babies,” a series of cast figures of crawling infants attached toŽižkov Television Tower.

In 2005, Černý created Shark, an image of Saddam Hussein in a tank of formaldehyde. The work was presented at the Prague Biennale 2 that same year. The work is a direct parody of a 1991 work by Damien Hirst, The Physical Impossibility of Death in the Mind of Someone Living. In 2006, the work was banned twice, first in Middelkerke, Belgium, then in Bielsko-Biała, Poland.[2] With respect to the Belgian situation, the mayor of that town, Michel Landuyt, admitted that he was worried that the exhibit could “shock people, including Muslims” in a year already marred by tensions associated with Danish cartoons depicting the prophet Mohammed.[3]

Via : http://www.davidcerny.cz/start.html

https://www.facebook.com/davidcerny.cz

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/David_%C4%8Cern%C3%BD