Miami artist works for food

Help wanted? Miami artist will work for food.

"Nashville After-image #1", acrylic on canvas, 20 x 16"

“Nashville After-image #1″, acrylic on canvas, 20 x 16”

"Miami After-image #1", acrylic on canvas, 16 x 20"

“Miami After-image #1″, acrylic on canvas, 16 x 20”

"Florida After-image #1", acrylic on canvas, 48 x 36". Collaboration with photographer/activist JohnBob Carlos.

“Florida After-image #1″, acrylic on canvas, 48 x 36”. Collaboration with photographer/activist JohnBob Carlos.

"Miami After-image #3", acrylic on canvas, 20 x 16"

“Miami After-image #3″, acrylic on canvas, 20 x 16”

"Miami After-image #2", acrylic on wood panel, 23.5 x 34.25"

“Miami After-image #2″, acrylic on wood panel, 23.5 x 34.25”

MIAMI, FL (Mar. 23, 2016) – Eco-artist Melanie Oliva will work for food, but not in the sense you might think. Oliva seeks to collaborate with activists, scientists and other artists with a goal in mind. She’s creating awareness for environmental issues with her artwork, in an effort to ensure Earth’s inhabitants will have enough food in the years to come. She believes that awareness, collaboration and action are the keys to protecting our fragile ecosystems and reversing the effects of climate change; otherwise, we could see drastic reductions in our food supply.

Oliva uses her “After-image” series to bring these issues to light, with each painting providing a problem and solution. From Oliva, “Each painting represents what you see when you close your eyes, after staring at something bright – suggesting the subject may only survive as an after-image unless action is taken. With this series, I have the ability to give endangered plants and animals a voice, who so desperately need our empathy and respect. I worry about the world my niece and nephew will inherit. I’ve found that using my artwork to convey a message can inspire people to act.”

Oliva’s advertising background has also been helpful in creating change. Last August, she collaborated with her brother Scott Dickerson and husband Mike Oliva to start Inspiration Pollination – a grassroots coalition of creators who use their work to connect the public with the plight of pollinators. “The group creates free advertising for pollinators and their role in food production, by encouraging members to incorporate them into their next project.”, says Oliva. After eight months, the online group has grown to more than 600 makers, gaining members from around the globe after an article was published by The Huffington Post. Oliva has witnessed people who may have never considered themselves environmentalists become advocates for bees, bats, butterflies and hummingbirds. You can join the group on Facebook, read their blog, and follow their progress on Twitter (@inspr8npollin8n) and Instagram (@inspirationpollination).

Oliva recently collaborated with photographer/activist JohnBob Carlos on “Florida After-image #1” to depict an area of the Everglades that will be negatively affected by the River of Grass Greenway bike path. She’s also advocated for the Florida Black Bears with her artwork and by writing a collaborative article for RedFlag.org. In addition, she’s volunteered with the grassroots group Imagine Our Florida to help get anti-bear hunt resolutions passed across the state. Oliva just recently completed a painting of Miami Seaquarium’s Lolita, inspired by the efforts of activists Sylvia Grimaldi Gomez and Danielle Daals, in hopes that Lolita will soon be retired to a sea-pen or protected cove.

If you’d like to collaborate with Melanie Oliva to help the voiceless or mitigate the effects of climate change, please visit melanieoliva.com or email inspirationpollination@gmail.com for more information.