Snowflake Fossils

I catch snowflakes and fossilize them, with cold and care and glue. It is generally quiet, tedious work and is often frustrating, but it is also a lovely exercise in patience and is quite satisfying.

When the snow is right, I bundle up, log the date and temperature, and select a snowflake I think I might like. Gently gently, I mount it on a frozen substrate (usually glass). This cycle is generally repeated until the snow stops. Then the wait begins for fossilization to finish; the curing process takes at least couple of days in the cold. Curing leaves a permanent record of the snowflakes, after which I may take pictures at my leisure and share what I find.

It’s a continuous experiment that keeps me marveling at the physics of good old H2O.

 

Snowflake landed January, 2014.

Snowflake landed January, 2014.

 

Snowflake landed November, 2014.

Snowflake landed November, 2014.

 

Snowflake landed March 1, 2014. Temperature 14ºF (-10ºC).

Snowflake landed March 1, 2014. Temperature 14ºF (-10ºC).

 

Snowflake landed February, 2014.

Snowflake landed February, 2014.

 

Snowflake landed January 12, 2015. Temperature 18ºF (-8ºC).

Snowflake landed January 12, 2015. Temperature 18ºF (-8ºC).

 

Snowflake fossil #45

Snowflake landed January 11, 2015. Temperature 8ºF (-13ºC).

Snowflake landed January 11, 2015. Temperature 8ºF (-13ºC).

 

Snowflake landed January 11, 2015. Temperature 8ºF (-13ºC).

Snowflake landed January 11, 2015. Temperature 8ºF (-13ºC).

 

Snowflake landed January 12, 2015. Temperature 18ºF (-8ºC).

Snowflake landed January 12, 2015. Temperature 18ºF (-8ºC).

 

Snowflake landed January 11, 2015. Temperature ~8ºF (-13ºC).

Snowflake landed January 11, 2015. Temperature ~8ºF (-13ºC).

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